Wills and Power of Attorney

Do you need a will?

If you want to make sure the people you care about inherit your assets, you should have a will.  Without a will, the state decides who gets your assets through a process called intestacy.  People you care about may not inherit your assets through intestacy.  I always charge an upfront flat fee for wills depending on the complexity of your case.


Do you need a Power of Attorney?

General Power of Attorney: Allows you to choose someone to manage your assets, pay your bills and make decisions about all aspects of your life.

Limited Power of Attorney:  Allows you to choose someone to make limited decisions.

Power of Attorney for Health Care (aka Living Will):  Allows you to keep control over your own medical care during times of incapacity through the prior appointment of an individual to make health care decisions.  A living will allows you to direct which measures will be used to extend your life in instances where there is no reasonable hope for recovery.

Financial Power of Attorney:  Allows you to choose someone to make decisions about your financial welfare.